The Demand for Extreme Differentiation in Your Content Strategy

All of you must have heard the oft repeated statement that content is king. However, this statement now needs to be qualified. For this let us dig a little deeper into QDD or query deserves diversity before we take a look at how QDD affects our content strategy.

For example if we type the word puma in the search box we will get mixed results for the word. Some will relate to the animal while others will be about the sports brand “Puma”. Here we are not sure as to what calculations Google uses to determine the ranking. May be they are related to QDD.

If you looked up the word Puma in AdWords you would see that the first result would be Puma which is ambiguous while the next four or five are related to the brand. When the ambiguous results are subtracted it was found that the search results relating to the animal were a mere 9.1%.

In case the link profile of the pages is mirrored in the search demand then it suggests a different ordering of results.

Therefore if we dig a little deeper we can outline the factors that are present for this type of query.

In case I am located in UK then the chances of me looking for the animal puma in Northern America are slim.

It is clear from the AdWords keyword tool that I am probably looking for the sports brand Puma and not the animal.

The very first result indicates that I am looking for the sports brand

When seen in totality it is observed that 90% of the time people who type the word puma in search boxes in the UK will be looking the sports brand Puma and not the animal.

It is clear from the search results one and three that the real search intent is the sports brand Puma in the UK. And as you go down the list you get search results of other variants of the same brand.

It is now clear that almost 70 to 90 percent were looking for the sports brand. However, 9.1% wanted results for the animal. And therefore it makes sense that the related page be listed in the second position which is ideal.

This conclusively proves that positioning of the Wikipedia page of the animal Puma in the search results is totally justified as there is one in ten chance that the search was intended for the animal Puma.

It has been observed that the first five or six or even ten pages might have relevant content but may not offer anything new in terms of content and hence have less rankings. This clearly makes a case for having new content that deals with different aspects of the searched word for it to consistently rank in the first few results.

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